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May will set out EU's sssurances to Parliament: Brexit update

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Prime Minister Theresa May makes a last-ditch attempt to save her Brexit deal, with a speech in anti-EU stronghold of Stoke-on-Trent.

[LONDON' Prime Minister Theresa May makes a last-ditch attempt to save her Brexit deal, with a speech in anti-EU stronghold of Stoke-on-Trent.

Speaking to the BBC, International Trade Secretary Liam Fox conceded that it was "unlikely" that May's Brexit deal would get through Parliament in its current form. Still, he expects the prime minister to push on with finding a solution even in the event of a heavy defeat, though he declined to comment on what her Plan B might be.

Fox said lawmakers "have a duty to make sure we leave the EU and do it in a way that minimizes disruption," pointing out that other countries including Belgium, the Netherlands and Ireland have much to lose from a no-deal Brexit -- not just the U.K.

"The public gave a clear instruction in the 2016 referendum," he said. "We have to honor that contract and leave the European Union as instructed," he said, adding that May's Brexit deal is still the best way to do that.

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May will explain to Parliament on Monday the reassurances that the EU is offering to help persuade MPs to back the deal, according to Trade Secretary Liam Fox.

The EU was expected to send a letter that makes clear that the much-loathed Irish backstop would only be temporary if it did come into effect. The letter will insist that the deal cannot be re-opened, according to Irish broadcaster RTE.

Members of Parliament who are opposing a no-deal Brexit will publish a draft law later on Monday aimed at handing control over the process to senior figures in Parliament, if May's deal is killed.

Tory former minister Nick Boles announced the move in an interview on BBC radio's Today program.

Under the plan, the Brexit process would be passed to the most experienced members of Parliament -- on the Commons Liaison Committee, Boles said. The best option would be if May comes forward with a sensible compromise, such as one modeled on Norway's relationship with the EU, he added.

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