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Rebirth Of An Icon

After making a splash in the eighties, the Pasha de Cartier is ready for a second coming.

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Pasha’s anti-conformist design – a square inside a circle – is what makes the watch look so distinctive and iconic.

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(Right) Pasha de Cartier skeleton watch; (Left) Pasha de Cartier watch, 35mm, automatic, white gold, diamonds.

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For 2020, the Maison turns the clock back to a watch that first originated in 1943 when it was presented to the Pasha El Glaoui of Marrakesh.

FEW watches transcend the fashion barrier but Cartier’s timepieces are a bit of an exception.

Through the decades, the Maison has captured the imagination of both collectors and fashionistas alike with models such as the Tank and Santos often finding its way onto the style pages of publications that don’t necessarily geek out over horology.

This is because there is something about the way Cartier designs its watches – bold yet timeless so it remains loved through the ages and by different generations.

For 2020, the Maison turns the clock back to a watch that first originated in 1943 when it was presented to the Pasha El Glaoui of Marrakesh; before it was officially launched as a collection in 1985.

The Pasha embraced everything audacious and excessive about the eighties fashion – from its strong round case contrasting with the square filigree rail-track on the dial; the outsized Arabic numerals; the pair of horizontal lugs; and the signature protruding crown protector that is attached to the watch by a chain.

It was the brainchild of the legendary Gerald Genta and the Pasha’s anti-conformist design – a square inside a circle – is what makes the watch look so distinctive and iconic.

STATEMENT-MAKING AESTHETICS

The fashion crowd embraced it for all its statement-making aesthetics and despite it being a watch for men, the ladies lusted over it way before the first ever official female model, the Pasha 32, was introduced in 1998. Miss Pasha, another colourful mini version made for women, followed in 2009.

Other notable iterations include Pasha C, the first to be introduced in steel in 1995; and Pasha 42, which as its name implies was even bolder and more masculine with bigger dimensions.

MAKING AN ENTRANCE

The Pasha continues to smell of ambition as it makes it re-entry in 2020 with a new unisex collection that stays largely faithful to the original save for a few modern updates.

The crown – hidden under the cabochon set cover – is now also set with blue spinel or sapphire, while a transparent caseback shows off the in-house automatic calibre 1847 MC.

Personalisation is also possible – strap changes can be done easily with just a push via the Cartier-developed QuickSwitch system located under the case, while initials can be engraved while staying tucked away from the public eye by a chainlinked shaped clasp attached to the crown.

The new models come in 35mm (without date) or 41mm (with date), in both steel and gold. Diamonds can also be set in the bezel, dial or bracelet for more bling. There are also skeletonised versions in steel; or gold, if you want a tourbillon along with it.

Forget about making an impression because in the world of fashion, this is what you call making an entrance

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