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Ferrari SF90 Spider: the S$2m convertible with an electric kick

BT_20201120_FERRARI2_4334630.jpg
Ferrari expects 60 per cent of its output to be hybrids in less than three years' time, but a pure electric car is not on the horizon.

BT_20201120_FERRARI2_4334630.jpg
Ferrari expects 60 per cent of its output to be hybrids in less than three years' time, but a pure electric car is not on the horizon.

BT_20201120_FERRARI2_4334630.jpg
Ferrari expects 60 per cent of its output to be hybrids in less than three years' time, but a pure electric car is not on the horizon.

Maranello, Italy

HOPEFULLY you didn't squander your fortune on Singles Day sales, because the day after that, Ferrari held a virtual launch for the SF90 Spider, its latest and currently most expensive car.

Its launch date and price for Singapore are still unconfirmed, but The Business Times estimates that the new Ferrari will sell for close to S$2 million without options or Certificate Of Entitlement.

A convertible version of its range-topping SF90 Stradale, the SF90 Spider has the same 1,000 horsepower petrol-electric, plug-in hybrid drivetrain. Its folding hardtop flips out of the way in 14 seconds (a manoeuvre that can be done at up to 45km/h), but perhaps the more impressive (and scary) measurement is that the new Ferrari can scramble to 100km/h in only 2.5 seconds.

0 to 200km/h takes just seven seconds flat, though that actually makes it 0.3 seconds slower than the SF90 Stradale. The performance deficit is because the open-top Spider is 100kg heavier.

The SF90 Spider's plug-in system gives it 25km of pure electric range on a single charge, which is good for a drive to work or, just as likely, for creeping silently home in the dead of night on electric power.

But fans of Ferrari's howling, high-revving engines can rest easy for now. The supercar specialist sees electric drive as a supplement to traditional petrol power, according to Enrico Galliera, Ferrari's chief commercial and marketing officer.

Of the SF90 Spider's 1000 horsepower output, 780hp is from a twin-turbo, 4.0-litre V8 engine.

"There's no doubt that the market is moving towards electric technology, and we cannot deny this direction," Mr Galliera told BT.

He said the supercar specialist's technical department is developing competencies around electric technology, and the SF90 range is an example of how Ferrari intends to blend battery power with combustion engines.

Ferrari expects 60 per cent of its output to be hybrids in less than three years' time, but a pure electric car is not on the horizon.

"For the time being we do not consider the existing electric technology suitable or effective for Ferrari's needs, in terms of performance and driving pleasure," he told BT.

At Ferrari, electric drive is not yet electrifying enough.

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