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Update your home with style

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Velvet works best in intense colours such as burgundy, like the Maxalto Dives sofa from Space Furniture.

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Copper and rose gold finishes give a warm contrast to dark, sombre hues, and with the festive season coming up, will add a beautiful sheen to party table settings.

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Deep blue furniture can also make a statement, like the large Tiptoe sofa from Sancal's Majestic Collection.

YOUR CHANCE TO SHINE

Copper and rose gold tones are shining in the spotlight, thanks to the fashion world adding pinkish gold accents to accessories, from handbags to watches. Not forgetting the new iPhone 6S's rose gold finish, which was introduced to the world in September.

The trend has spilled over into the home, with hardware and accessories such as lamps and cutlery being the easiest ways to add a glam touch - without looking over-done. Copper and rose gold finishes also give a warm contrast to dark, sombre hues, and with the festive season coming up, will add a beautiful sheen to party table settings. The material is best used in the kitchen, such as Tom Dixon's new Brew range of copper-coated stainless steel tools - from a stove-top coffee-maker to a coffee scoop - for coffee fetishists.

MOODY BLUES

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From midnight blue to inky indigo, deep blue hues are the new black for interior designers. And the best way to use a darker colour is on the walls of a room, so it gives an overall depth, intimacy and richness.

These sombre shades are versatile too, going together with other colours like red, pink, coral and metallic tones, such as those seen in Dulux's 2016 palette called Infinite Worlds. Lighten the mood with a mix of cool neutral colours and materials such as natural wood, stone and marble.

A dark backdrop like navy is also the perfect canvas for showing off art or a statement piece of furniture, such as a sofa or dining table. Deep blue furniture can also make a statement, like the large Tiptoe sofa and the upholstered Mosaico mini-sofa with marble-top side-table, both from Sancal's Majestic Collection at Dream Interiors. Just want to dip your toes in and experiment? Add little bolts from the blue, such as throw cushions, rugs and vases, instead.

PLUSH CRUSH

Designers are moving away from clean Scandinavian minimalism - which has been all the rage over the last 10 years - and going for more decadent looks, like velvet upholstery. In sparing touches, velvet gives homes a sumptuous yet cosy feel, and works well in the living room and bedroom. Inspired by the 1970s-style fashion seen on the catwalks, this opulent trend has been given a style update.

These days, the soft, strokeable fabric is best used as a chic focal point on couches and armchairs. Velvet works best in intense colours such as burgundy, like the Maxalto Dives sofa from Space Furniture. For smaller - and more affordable - doses of tactile luxury, scatter velvet cushions over your sofa or place a velvet table runner over the dining table.

BACK TO NATURE

Natural woods and leafy designs - seen in patterns, textiles and wallpaper - are bringing the outdoors into the home. Take inspiration from British interiors label House of Hackney, with its bold range of palm and fern prints on wallpaper.

Organic-inspired ideas that continue to be popular include wall hangings of botany, insect prints and fossils; floral and plant motifs on wallpaper, bedding and curtains; rough-hewn accessories like lamps made from natural materials such as salvaged wood and cork; and tactile furnishings such as throw pillows and table cloths in natural fibres.

Linen is a good material to start with and, with their natural wrinkled look, add a modern vibe to living rooms, kitchens and bedrooms. Or go for the real thing with, yes, actual houseplants.

Forget fussy terrariums. Instead, think big, leafy plants that are also suitable for Singapore's climate, like the dumb cane (dieffenbachia), the areca palm and the Boston fern. Wall-hung indoor planters in the kitchen are also great for growing your own herbs.

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