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ChildAid is growing up into its teenage years

And creative director Dick Lee wants more teenagers to take the stage for its 14th edition this year.

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ChildAid creative director Dick Lee hopes this year's theme, Jumpin' Jukebox Jive, with its focus on pop music, will attract older teens. Seen here (above) is an item from a ChildAid performance earlier this year.

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ChildAid creative director Dick Lee (above) hopes this year's theme, Jumpin' Jukebox Jive, with its focus on pop music, will attract older teens. Seen here is an item from a ChildAid performance earlier this year.

THE ChildAid charity concert is "more than just a kiddy show", and Singapore's leading singer-songwriter Dick Lee wants more teenagers to take the stage this year.

The 62-year-old is back as its creative director for the second year. The annual event, in its 14th edition, is organised by The Business Times and The Straits Times.

Said Mr Lee: "It's a great platform for the younger talent to do their thing. Last year's show really lived up to my expectations, especially after seeing all the talent and energy (the performers had)."

While participation is open to those aged five to 19, Mr Lee noted that the average age of ChildAid performers in past shows is typically between 10 and 12.

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He hopes that this year's theme, Jumpin' Jukebox Jive, will attract the older teens as it features pop music from the past 60 years.

"There is a misconception that ChildAid is just a show for young kids and I want to change that this year," said Mr Lee.

He added: "The pop music genre will suit the older kids, those aged 14 and above. Everybody takes to pop culture, they understand pop music very easily. I want a wider range of talent this time."

Staged at Resorts World Sentosa on Nov 25 and 26, this year's showpiece will be split into various sections, where each section will feature pop music from a specific decade.

Said Mr Lee: "Most of the audience are parents (of the performers) and I wanted to have music that is familiar to them and their kids."

Children who can, sing, dance, host or play a musical instrument to the tune of any pop song can send a video of their performance to childaid@dickleeasia.com by July 20. The video should not exceed 90 seconds and 15MB. Shortlisted candidates will be invited to audition on July 28 and 29.

Over the years, ChildAid has raised more than S$16 million for BT's Budding Artists Fund and ST's School Pocket Money Fund.

The former provides arts training for financially disadvantaged children, and the latter helps such children pay for transport to school and meals during recess.

BT editor Wong Wei Kong said: "ChildAid 2018 promises to bring back fond memories with the most-loved pop songs of the past decades, but it's also very much about the future - helping the beneficiaries of ST SPMF and BT BAF to hit their own highs."