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1970s billboards by the United Artists’ Front of Thailand protesting hegemonies.

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Dede Eri Supria’s painting Labyrinth (1987 – 1988) looks at consumerism and urban poverty in Indonesia.

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S. Priyanto’s wall drawing Topi Made In France(1976) challenges colonialism and military dictatorship in Indonesia.

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One of 50 woodblock prints by Hong Sungdam depicting the 1980s political turmoil of Korea.

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(Left) Yoko Ono’s iconic feminist work Cut Piece (1964). (Right) Siti Adiyati’s 1979 installation of gilded roses among water hyacinths, a critique of the 1 percent.

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In the 1990s, Li Yilin put an illegal brickwall on a busy road to protest China’s rapid urbanisation.

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(Left) Tang Da Wu’s They Poach the Rhino, Chop Off His Horn And Make This Drink (1989). (Right) Jose Tence Ruiz’s jeepney-inspired sculpture Erding Erdrayb & His Eye Catching Palace (1980).

Art: All Shook Up

National Gallery Singapore mounts its best exhibition ever – a showcase of electrifying art chronicling change and transformation in Asia over 30 years
Jun 14, 2019 5:50 AM

NATIONAL GALLERY SINGAPORE has never felt more alive and kicking than it does now with the opening of a new exhibition titled Awakenings: Art In Society In Asia 1960s - 1990s. It showcases socially- and politically-engaged Asian art across the decades, and has the

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