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Businesses can find part-time staff 'in three hours' with employment agency's app

STAFF shortages can be a constant bind for businesses in the food and beverage (F&B), retail and cleaning sectors.

However, an employment agency has updated its app with QR code technology which it claims can link these firms up with part-time staff in just three hours so they can start work the same day.

"The QR code acts as a unique, fast and effective way to bridge the gap between employers and employees," said YY Hong Ye Group's managing director Pauline Low. "Employers can now gain quick access to our pool of 98,000 part-timers within seconds."

YY Hong Ye launched its part-time jobs app in July last year which required employers to e-mail or call the company when they were looking for staff.

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With the new technology, launched on Tuesday, the process has been streamlined so that employers looking for workers can now just scan a QR code alerting YY to their requirements, so it can connect them to a worker on its database who fits the bill.

The company believes the app will be particularly helpful to the F&B industry.

Cantonese restaurant Dragon Bowl, which is owned by YY, uses the app as it relies heavily on part-time staff. Its manager Iris Loke told The Straits Times in Mandarin:"The biggest challenge is the quota of foreigners we can hire. Without it, actually there would be no problem with staffing.

"Locals find the shifts in F&B too long, and they spend the hours in between lunchtime and dinnertime just sitting around. They find it a waste of time."

By using the app, business owners can get around local to foreigner quota regulations because staff hired through it are outsourced to YY.

The company says its part-time staff must pass "stringent face-to-face interviews and in-house quality training". All training costs are borne by YY.

The application has over 98,000 registered users, more than half of whom are aged 16 to 25. Fifteen per cent are 60 and over.

THE STRAITS TIMES