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Slow to change, Kodak now clings to a future beyond film

But CEO Jeff Clarke is mining the history of the company for its underlying technologies

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At Eastman Business Park in Rochester, Kodak researchers develop next-generation touch-screen sensors (above), and a worker processes chemicals used in manufacturing. Kodak has no delusions that the company could bring its technologies to market on its own; it will need corporate partners to make actual products.

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At Eastman Business Park in Rochester, Kodak researchers develop next-generation touch-screen sensors, and a worker processes chemicals used in manufacturing (above). Kodak has no delusions that the company could bring its technologies to market on its own; it will need corporate partners to make actual products.

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"Clarke is what Kodak needs. He's more like an entrepreneur, and he never sleeps in the same place two nights running. People say, 'He's not Rochester, he's not Kodak.' I say, 'Good for him.' " - William Pollack, who runs the manufacturer Kingsbury Corp, on Kodak's Jeff Clarke (above)

New York

OF THE roughly 200 buildings that once stood on the 526-hectare campus of Eastman Kodak's business park in Rochester, New York, 80 have been demolished and 59 others sold off. Terry Taber, bespectacled, 60, and a loyal Kodak employee of 34 years, still works in one of the...

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