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Hemingway library

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Fellow author Graham Greene visited Hemingway and made a comment about the difficulty of writing while surrounded by so many dead animals

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The separate tower room at Finca Vigia, with views over the 10-acre estate. A painting of Hemingway on safari is above the bookshelf.

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Bust of Ernest Hemingway in Cojimar. Local legend has it that the bust was cast from brass pieces donated by village fishermen

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A 1959 Buick convertible in front of a 17th-century fort in Cojimar, the small fishing village where Hemingway's sportfishing boat Pilar was berthed

Write Angles

Ernest Hemingway's House in Cuba is still filled with his belongings and his massive collection of books. Geoffrey Eu gets a glimpse into the literary legend's rarefied space, now a museum.
Dec 24, 2016 5:50 AM

Books, booze, broads and billfish - not necessarily in that order - were central to Ernest Hemingway's way of life. A constant supply of each was available to the Nobel prize-winning author in Cuba, the Caribbean island where he felt most at home.

Hemingway was machismo personified,