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Every detail of the structure, from the locally-milled wood to the communal dining space, inspires connection to the community and their traditions.

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The communal and dining spaces are downstairs; and sleeping spaces are in the loft upstairs, with one room facing sunrise and one facing sunset.

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The project is said to be inspired by another Airbnb host in rural Japan where the elderly lady host enlists locals as tour guides and translators for guests, creating a micro tourism economy.

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Fish can be caught along the river and brought into the home.

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Guests can book the Yoshino Cedar House through Airbnb, and revenue goes back to the community

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The multipurpose space below two suspended glass boxes (annexe second floor) with bedrooms.

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The family room, annexe first floor of Sekeping Kong Heng

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The mini playground and open space on the ground floor

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The riverine community of Kuala Sepetang fishing village

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Volunteers from Taiwan and Malaysia posing with the house they built

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Kids are welcome to make their creative mark in the communal space

Space for Change

Design and architecture aren't always about creating good-looking buildings or spaces. They can also be agents of social change. Three projects show how architects are transforming rural communities in Japan and Malaysia.
May 13, 2017 5:50 AM

Yoshino Cedar House
Nara, Japan

Yoshino is a little district in Nara prefecture that, like most rural communities in Japan, has seen its young people leave in droves for the big city, leaving behind stagnating industry and economic uncertainty.

But

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