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New York's Harlem is getting posh and it's getting pushback from poorer residents

The heartland of African-American culture is undergoing intrusive - and whiter - change, critics say

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Paris Blues jazz bar in Harlem. Real estate brokers are pestering Mr Hargress to sell for US$10 million.

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Photos and mementos of owner Samuel Hargress on the walls of the bar. Real estate brokers are pestering Mr Hargress to sell for US$10 million.

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A photo of former US president Barack Obama and his wife Michelle. Real estate brokers are pestering Mr Hargress to sell for US$10 million.

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When chef Julian Medina, owner of La Chula taqueria in East Harlem, first opened his taco joint, he thought that most of his customers would be Hispanic. Instead they're mostly white Americans.

New York

IN 1969, Samuel Hargress bought his Harlem jazz bar and the surrounding building for US$35,000. Half a century later, he says real estate brokers keep pestering him to sell - for US$10 million.

Such is the breakneck pace of gentrification in one of the most storied

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