OPINION

Why investors love Singapore's struggling malls

SINGAPOREANS are not spending like they used to, at least not in shopping malls. There are too many already and more are being built. But investors still have good reasons to back mall owners.

Investors still love Singapore’s struggling malls

[HONG KONG] Singaporeans aren't spending like they used to, at least not in shopping malls. There are too many already and more are being built. But investors still have good reasons to back mall owners.

COMMENTARY

How India's banks ran up a US$7 billion phone bill

FOR a capital-starved economy, India shows little urgency to extricate good money stuck in failed businesses. That was going to change after the adoption of a modern bankruptcy regime in May 2016. Alas, legal improvements notwithstanding, the culture of extending the life of bad loans to big...

OPINION

Singapore's Grab can't afford to fail the finance test

AFTER sending rival Uber Technologies Inc packing from Singapore and other South-east Asian markets, homegrown ride-hailing firm Grab has set itself a stiffer target. It wants to be a regional super-app.

COMMENTARY

Can central banks go broke? Ask India

AN institution with money-printing powers should have no difficulty keeping the lights on. But could it continue to act effectively after depleting its net worth?

COMMENTARY

State Bank of India is still too cheerful after eight misfires

STATE Bank of India chairman Rajnish Kumar wants to assure investors he's in complete control of the "demon" of soured loans. Not so fast, Aladdin....

COMMENTARY

Modi can't afford a weak rupee now

JUST as some analysts were starting to believe in a reset for the Indian rupee, with the government becoming more relaxed about letting it weaken, history got in the way.

Singapore home prices won't pop without migrants

[HONG KONG] If Sherman Kwek sounds annoyed, he has his reasons — 2.9 million square feet worth of reasons.

COMMENTARY

How to end Japan's deflation? Abolish cash

MONETARY medicine in Japan is keeping the economy alive, but with nasty side effects. The search for a new cure should begin with a simple question: What if the Bank of Japan were to throw out its money-printing presses? Instead of pushing more yen into an economy that has already absorbed a...