COMMENTARY

UK destined for economic damage and weak currency

AS a biographer of Winston Churchill, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson must know that markets can unravel even the best-laid economic plans - as they did following his predecessor's ill-advised decision in 1926 to return the UK to the gold standard at the wrong exchange rate.

COMMENTARY

Emerging markets spoil IMF optimism

JUDGING by its recent World Economic Outlook report, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is pinning its hopes for a much-needed boost to the stagnating world economy on an emerging market rebound in the second half of 2019. There are at least two reasons to believe that the Fund's optimism in...

THE BOTTOM LINE

The next financial crisis may be worse than that of 2008

IT is difficult to forecast when the next global economic recession will happen. It is much easier to predict its severity.

THE BOTTOM LINE

Washington must remain alert to Brexit risks

IT is tempting for Washington and for markets to dismiss the UK's exit from the European Union as a problem affecting a former imperial power with little relevance to the US and global economies. That would be a grave mistake....

COMMENTARY

Powell should ease US monetary policy

IN 2017, a key monetary policy mistake of the US Federal Reserve under Janet Yellen was to keep monetary policy too loose despite a strong increase in US stock prices. Hopefully her successor, Jay Powell, does not make that mistake in reverse by keeping monetary policy unnecessarily tight...

COMMENTARY

Don't blame Powell for market slump

IF THERE is one person who will undeservedly be publicly dragged over the coals by US President Donald Trump for the bursting of the stock market bubble, it surely will be Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell after Wednesday's latest interest rate increase....

COMMENTARY

Rome's budget antics threaten to drag EU and euro into crisis

US policymakers and world financial markets are surprisingly calm about the deepening Italian economic crisis. Italy's economy is 10 times larger than Greece's. If it fails, the euro cannot survive. It would also be too costly for its European partners to save....