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German shooter video stays online despite crackdown

Hong Kong

VIDEO of a deadly shooting in Germany was easily accessible on 4chan, BitChute and other sites on Thursday, attracting tens of thousands of views, despite efforts by tech companies to curb the spread of violent content.

Roughly 24 hours after the attack, video and links to an anti-Semitic "manifesto" published a week earlier by the gunman were also still available online using a simple keyword search on popular anonymous online forum 4chan.

The assault in city of Halle, which left two people dead on Wednesday, took place as Jews marked the holy day of Yom Kippur, with the gunman streaming the attack live online.

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The assailant's 35-minute video was originally livestreamed on Twitch, an Amazon-owned, gaming-focused streaming platform.

Twitch said it was viewed live by just five users and a recording was seen by 2,200 people before it was flagged and removed.

But the full video was still available on Thursday on multiple sites promoting violent and sexual content. Two video links found by AFP had been viewed more than 90,000 times, according to the sites' visitor counters.

One of them, BitChute, is a video-hosting service which enables peer-to-peer sharing. It has become popular with the global "alt-right" as it avoids content restrictions on social media platforms like YouTube by relying on user donations rather than advertising.

BitChute has hosted content from prominent conspiracy theorists who have been banned from YouTube.

Users of 4chan have also repeatedly shared links to the full video from Halle since it was first uploaded on Wednesday. A keyword search for "Halle" on the forum led to multiple posts with links to the footage.

On another online forum, kiwifarms.net, AFP found at least one user offering a link to download the full video using torrent software, along with full instructions.

But the video was not readily available on Thursday on mainstream social networking platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

This is in contrast to the livestreamed footage of the Christchurch mosque shootings in March, which was continually re-uploaded to these platforms despite a concerted effort to remove it. AFP