You are here

S India's tribal people saving India's forests with gourmet coffee harvests

BT_20181016_ARAKU_3590428.jpg
Coffee estates thrived in the Araku Valley's cool climate during the British colonial period.

Bangkok

ONCE FORBIDDEN by colonialists from cultivating coffee, indigenous people in southern India have won a prestigious award for their bean, which they farm while fighting deforestation.

Araku Valley Coffee won gold in the Prix Epicures OR Award in Paris earlier this month. The beans are grown by Adivasis - or "original inhabitants" - of southern Andhra Pradesh state through a cooperative set up by the Naandi Foundation.

The organic farming model has benefited more than 45,000 Adivasi families, with profits from the high-grade coffee put into schools, healthcare and other needs of the remote community, according to Manoj Kumar, who founded Naandi.

sentifi.com

Market voices on:

The initiative has been a success because it built on the strong connection that Adivasis have to the forest, he said. "They fully embraced the concept of biodynamic farming, because it is a holistic approach that benefits the ecosystem, and is in tune with their traditional beliefs of caring for the community and the forest," he said.

The Adivasis are also countering deforestation by planting millions of mango, papaya and orange trees to provide shade for their coffee crops, as well as in other areas, with support from the Paris-based Global Livelihoods Funds.

While India has pledged to keep a third of its total land area under forest and tree cover, a growing population and increasing demand for land for mining and other industrial activities are placing greater stress on forests. Activists say a new forest law favouring commercial plantations would undermine indigenous rights over forests and lead to more logging.

Coffee estates thrived in the Araku valley's cool climate during the British colonial period, but Adivasis were prevented from growing it and did not take up the crop after independence, according to Mr Kumar.

That changed after the Naandi Foundation began working in the region 18 years ago, first setting up schools and healthcare facilities, and then helping to organise a cooperative to farm and market coffee. REUTERS