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Sunseap to build one of the world's largest offshore floating solar farms along Straits of Johor

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Sunseap Group is developing one of the world's largest offshore floating photovoltaic systems, to be located along the Straits of Johor north of Woodlands Waterfront Park.

SUNSEAP Group is developing one of the world's largest offshore floating photovoltaic systems, to be located along the Straits of Johor north of Woodlands Waterfront Park - a site which the government's Pro-Enterprise Panel (PEP) helped to identify.

Supported by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB), the five megawatt-peak system will generate about 6,388 megawatt-hours of renewable energy annually, once completed. This is equivalent to powering about 1,250 four-room flats, with a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of about 2,600 tonnes every year. The five-hectare pilot in Woodlands is expected to be commercially operational early next year.

Sunseap co-founder and chief executive officer Frank Phuan noted that in land-scarce countries such as Singapore, the widespread use of solar power is hindered by space constraints, including limited roof space. The successful delivery of Sunseap's new project will be important in opening up similar opportunities for sea-based floating photovoltaic systems in Singapore and the region, he added.

Said EDB executive director of energy, chemicals and materials Damian Chan: "Beyond contributing to Singapore’s energy security and climate change commitments, Sunseap’s offshore floating photovoltaic system will help the clean energy ecosystem and build new, exportable capabilities for potential scale-up across the region."

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Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing highlighted the project as an example of how agencies can work across sectors to enable businesses, at the PEP - Singapore Business Federation Awards on Friday morning.

Identifying a site for the project had been a challenge, with regulatory agencies raising concerns such as the potential impact on biodiversity and obstruction to shipping lanes. The PEP stepped in to help, providing coordination among the relevant agencies. With a whole-of-government approach, the site was identified within a month.

"This is why it is so important for our public servants to understand issues, not just within their agencies, but to collaborate across multiple agencies, so that we do not make the environment any more difficult than it need be for our businesses," said Mr Chan.

The top-ranked agencies this year were the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, Singapore Land Authority and Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore. A total of 28 awards were given to businesses, trade associations and public agencies at Friday's awards ceremony.