You are here

Hong Kong police issue warning amid calls for new demonstrations

doc7aqsd7tj5uo1m03yw9lm_doc7apo7du7ott14hp2sih7.jpg
Thousands of protesters clashed with police on Sunday in the first big demonstrations since a wave of violent protests last year.

[HONG KONG] Hong Kong police issued a warning late on Tuesday that they would not tolerate disruptions to public order, after activists circulated calls online for fresh demonstrations on Wednesday.

A new national security law proposed last week by Beijing has revived mass protests by demonstrators who say China aims to curb the freedoms enjoyed in Hong Kong, a global financial centre with broad autonomy.

Thousands of protesters clashed with police on Sunday in the first big demonstrations since a wave of violent protests last year. Financial markets have been alarmed by the prospect of a dramatic assertion of Chinese control over the city.

Calls were circulated on Tuesday on online forums for a general strike and protests on Wednesday against a national anthem law due for a second reading in the city's Legislative Council. Such calls do not always result in protests. Police said gatherings must not disrupt traffic and warned of jail terms for those who cause illegal disturbances.

The anthem law would require schools to teach China's national anthem, organisations to play it and sing it, and anyone who disrespects it to face jail or fines.

Protesters see it as a symbol of China's encroachment on Hong Kong's way of life, as manifest in the security law floated last week, which could pave the way for mainland security agencies to open up branches in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong authorities insist there is no threat to the city's autonomy.

"There is no need for us to worry," the city's Chief Executive Carrie Lam told a weekly news conference. "In the last 23 years, whenever people worried about Hong Kong's freedom of speech and freedom of expression and protest, time and again, Hong Kong has proven that we uphold and preserve those values."

The United States has branded the security law a "death knell" for the city's autonomy. Britain, which ruled Hong Kong until returning it to China in 1997, said it was deeply concerned by a law it said would undermine the "one country, two systems" principle under which Hong Kong is governed.

Hong Kong's Bar Association said the draft had "worrying and problematic features". According to the draft proposal last week, the legislation aims to tackle secession, subversion and terrorist activities.

On Sunday, police fired tear gas and water cannons to disperse thousands of people who thronged the streets to protest against the proposed legislation. Almost 200 were arrested.

REUTERS

BT is now on Telegram!

For daily updates on weekdays and specially selected content for the weekend. Subscribe to t.me/BizTimes