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The three-wheeler that could make your car obsolete

Taiwanese brand Adiva says Singapore could be the regional leader for its AD1 Electric scooter

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With a 32 horsepower electric motor and 7 kilowatt-hour lithium ion battery, the AD1 Electric can travel 120km to 150km on a single charge. Its battery is far smaller than an electric car's, so the scooter also takes much less time to top up - less than an hour from a standard, low-speed charging point.

Singapore

TAIWAN-BASED scooter manufacturer, Adiva, is known for its interesting spin on mobility.

With a roof and three wheels, its scooters are aimed at white-collar workers who want the flexibility and ease of a scooter, but with extra weather protection and stability.

Now, it's taking a step towards making what it sees as the perfect urban runabout: a battery-powered version named the AD1 Electric.

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Adiva's local distributor Mah Pte Ltd assessed the only working prototype of the AD1 Electric, with a view to launching it here next year.

With a 32 horsepower electric motor and 7 kilowatt-hour lithium ion battery, the AD1 Electric can travel 120km to 150km on a single charge. Its battery is far smaller than an electric car's, so the scooter also takes much less time to top up - less than an hour from a standard, low-speed charging point.

While electric motorcycles exist in Singapore, they have not been sold in commercially significant numbers. But Eugene Chong, a regional sales manager for the Adiva Group, says such machines are often promoted overseas for their zero emissions status.

"Electric scooters are very popular in China and Taiwan because of the strong political will behind it," he says. Adiva believes they would also make sense in Singapore.

"Fuel prices here are amongst the most expensive in South-east Asia, and now there is increasing support towards electric vehicles," he says. "And Singapore always leads the way. If something is popular here then it's likely to spread to the region."