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Male mammoths were more likely to die in silly ways

Study posits that young males were more prone to risky behaviour after leaving protection of the herd upon puberty

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A mammoth tusk in Siberia. The study argued that once males left their herd and became loners or joined bachelor groups led by inexperienced males, they were more likely to do something risky and find themselves stuck in, say, frozen muck.

SWALLOWED by a sinkhole. Washed away by a mudflow. Drowned after falling through thin ice.

These are the fates that many unlucky mammoths suffered in Siberia thousands of years ago. Their well-preserved fossils have provided paleobiologists with insight into their prehistoric lives. Now,

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