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WHIMSY, PROVOCATIVE, THOUGHTFUL: The Dear Ingo chandelier is fashioned out of angled work lamps.
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WHIMSY, PROVOCATIVE, THOUGHTFUL: Gilad's exhibition in Tel Aviv included Le Corbusier's iconic LC2 sofa, snapped in two to create what looks like a dystopian heart (above) and a door which became a triumphal arch signifying free passage.
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WHIMSY, PROVOCATIVE, THOUGHTFUL: Gilad's exhibition in Tel Aviv included Le Corbusier's iconic LC2 sofa, snapped in two to create what looks like a dystopian heart and a door which became a triumphal arch signifying free passage (above).
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WHIMSY, PROVOCATIVE, THOUGHTFUL: The Tavolino coffee table, unlike the traditional one, does not have sharp corners.
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'The starting point of an idea ... is an attempt for me to understand things better or confuse myself more. I don't distinguish between the two (art and design) when I start a project.' - Ron Gilad (above)

Melding art and design

Artist Ron Gilad turns his hand to designing furniture in a process that deconstructs traditional furniture construction.
Feb 14, 2015 5:50 AM

LIKE many good artists, Ron Gilad, 42, does not really care what the viewer thinks. "I am very, very selfish. I am not trying to satisfy anyone but myself," he says.

In an exhibition of his works in Tel Aviv, where he was born, it was very clear that the art on display came from a very