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THE BROAD VIEW

Why 'sorry' is still the hardest word

Two apologies by two high-profile figures were likely prompted more by politics than genuine contrition.
Saturday, April 15, 2017 - 05:50

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United Airlines boss Oscar Munoz (seen above during a meeting with US President Donald Trump at the White House) was likely thinking more about his staff than the public outrage, says PR adviser Stu Loeser, while Mr Trump's press secretary Sean Spicer had in mind his boss' view that apologising is a character flaw. Hence their initial reluctance to admit error or show remorse.

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Mr Trump's press secretary Sean Spicer (above) had in mind his boss' view that apologising is a character flaw. Hence their initial reluctance to admit error or show remorse.

I'M sorry. Two simple words, not so simply said. On Wednesday, the public representatives of two embattled American institutions - United Airlines and the White House - found themselves on national television grappling with a delicate and increasingly common ritual of the corporate and political

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