Indonesian snackers becoming more health conscious, though indulgence remains a priority: poll

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The American confectionery, food, and beverage giant noted increasing health awareness among Indonesian consumers, as 92 per cent of them rank health as an important factor when choosing snacks. 
DECEMBER 23, 2019 - 5:12 PM

MORE Indonesians are taking health into their consideration when snacking, though indulgence still remains a key motivator for snacking, according to a report by Mondelez International. 

The American confectionery, food, and beverage giant noted increasing health awareness among Indonesian consumers, as 92 per cent of them rank health as an important factor when choosing snacks. 

This is on a par with the importance of convenience and quality to Indonesian consumers. These three elements are among the top five most important factors when Indonesians choose their snacks. 

Further, two-thirds of Indonesian adults think snacks of the future will be healthier than today, a whole 12 percentage points higher than the global average. 

For Indonesian snackers, the top three preferences for future snacks - vitamin-rich, low-sugar, and fresh - all clocked scores well above the global average.

That said, when it comes to snacking, indulgence still remains a priority for Indonesians, as 90 per cent of them said they snack to pamper, spoil, or reward themselves, which is 12 percentage points higher than the global average.

Emre Olcer, South-east Asia president, Mondelez International, said: “It seems like Indonesians understand how to pamper themselves through snacking.” 

The report also noted that 86 per cent of Indonesians use snacks to connect with others. Erna Ermawati Chotim, head of the sociology department of Universitas Nasional, attributed it to the fact that Indonesians, as a collectivist society, love to socialize with others, such as using snacks as an ice-breaker during moments of togetherness.

Convenience is an important factor of consideration to Indonesian snackers due to their increasing activities and mobilities, said the report. Three in four Indonesian adults said that quick, on-the-go bites are more suited to their lifestyle than full meals, and 77 per cent said they prefer to eat many small meals throughout the day, as opposed to a few large meals. 

The report added that 57 per cent of Indonesians hold the expectation of snacks being more “convenient” in the next five years, while globally the average figure is 33 per cent.

“Understanding the top motivators for Indonesian adults to snack, which is for emotional and mental well-being, there is room for providing such snacks for them to indulge,” said Mr Olcer. “Fun-to-eat snacks, or snacks that can strengthen family’s tradition also have a big opportunity in Indonesia. Looking at Indonesian people’s preference for snacks in the future, healthier snacks are also a segment to pay attention for.