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Demand for tech jobs in Singapore grew 20% over last year: report

Recruiting firm says supply of tech talent with niche skills can barely keep up with high demand

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The highest paid roles in the technology sector include chief technology officer, with an average monthly salary of S$22,000, followed by an IT director or head of IT security, who earns an average of S$18,000.

Singapore

THE demand for technology jobs in Singapore rose by 20 per cent in the last 12 months, according to a recent Salary Benchmark 2019 report by recruiting firm Michael Page.

In particular, the report noted that there is a high demand in Singapore for specialised e-commerce, digital marketing and data science talent, but a shortage of supply; with companies seeking leaders who can drive digital strategy while anticipating technology disruptors.

According to the report, the highest paid roles in the technology sector include chief technology officer, with an average monthly salary of S$22,000, followed by an IT director or head of IT security, who earns an average of S$18,000.

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Meanwhile under the digital sector, an e-commerce director receives an average of S$23,000 per month, while a digital marketing director has an average monthly salary of S$18,000, and an employee dealing with user experience web analytics including SEO (search engine optimisation) or SEM (search engine marketing), draws about S$9,600 per month.

"The need for niche skills, and the evolving technology landscape is seeing a huge transformation. In line with this, the expectations of salary increase when switching jobs in similar industries are about 12-20 per cent for technology talent, and 10-15 per cent for digital talent," the report said.

Though digital transformation is the ongoing focus, cybersecurity prefaces many organisations' ability to improve operational technology, and there is a huge demand for IT security roles, as well as digital transformation-led technical roles.

In addition, the research shows that 29 per cent of Singapore professionals would switch jobs to develop new skills, while 60 per cent of job seekers feel positive about the employment market.

Shinjika Shukla, associate director of technology practice at Michael Page Singapore said: "In a market where roles in technology and digital can be hard to fill, employers need to invest in excellent workplace training and development. This is a spur to attracting great candidates - and helps you retain them as well.

"Candidates seek evidence that a company is committed to their development, and will value their projects. Technology can be boom-bust, so job seekers place a premium on the stability and long-term viability of the firm. They expect clear details on the exposure to new technologies - some might even entertain a pay cut for exposure that boosts their market value."

Separately, Singtel unit NCS is partnering the National University of Singapore's Institute of Systems Science (NUS-ISS) to train more than 1,000 digital ICT employees and new hires over the next two years, the two organisations announced on Friday.

The collaboration includes technical training for mid-career NCS employees and training for new software engineers. NCS's subject matter experts will also be accredited as adjunct teaching staff in NUS-ISS, while NCS will offer internship and project opportunities to NUS-ISS students. - With additional reporting by Janice Heng