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More Baby Yoda? The Mandalorian's back in October with spin-offs in the works

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Baby Yoda has taken the world by storm, says Disney chief Bob Iger: "We know there is great anticipation for the substantial array of Baby Yoda consumer products hitting the market in the coming months.

Los Angeles

DISNEY is ramping up its Baby Yoda content with the next series of The Mandalorian set for October and potential spinoffs in the works, chief Bob Iger said on Tuesday.

The live-action Star Wars television show launched last year was a hit for new streaming platform Disney+, with its tiny, cute co-star taking "the world by storm", said Mr Iger.

Setting an October launch for season two on an earnings call, Mr Iger promised "more coming from The Mandalorian thereafter, including the possibility of infusing it with more character".

This could include "taking those characters in their own direction in terms of series", he said.

"The priority in the next few years is television" for Star Wars, Mr Iger added.

The Mandalorian follows a mysterious bounty hunter played by Pedro Pascal (Game of Thrones) who roams the galaxy's lawless outer reaches looking for mercenary work.

During the first season he formed an unlikely bond with a small, adorable creature officially called "The Child", but dubbed Baby Yoda by online fans. The mischievous, green tyke launched thousands of memes, knocking Democratic presidential candidates off the top of news searches.

"Of course I would be remiss if I didn't mention a certain child in The Mandalorian who has taken the world by storm," Mr Iger told investors, hailing a "sensational response to this new character".

"We know there is great anticipation for the substantial array of Baby Yoda consumer products hitting the market in the coming months," he added.

Mr Iger also flagged previously announced Star Wars television shows, including the return of Ewan McGregor as Obi-Wan Kenobi, and a prequel to movie spin-off Rogue One.

Disney's Marvel films have a massively successful history of creating interlinking movies - and now television shows - which "share" popular superhero characters. AFP